Ken McGill lands first patent for GC

  • U.S. Patent #9,441,993 was issued Tuesday, Sept. 13, giving Georgia College ownership of McGill’s new theory: the “Conduit Bound Propagation Separation Model.” The method will lead to constructing a better flow-meter to measure fluids in interstate pipelines worth trillions of dollars a day.
  • The patent brings a new level of distinction to the university, showcasing success in its science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs, said Kenneth J. Procter, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.
  • Over the years, undergrads constructed “bits and pieces” of the flow-meter, pushed buttons when directed by computer code and got “just a glimmer of how things work” by graduation. Five students currently collect data. They’ll help write findings in science publications and co-author anything McGill publishes.
  • About half of all U.S. interstate commerce travels through pipelines. Industries like petroleum, pharmaceutical, chemical and mining must know precisely when materials begin and stop flowing. Businesses can’t afford to lose a single drop of expensive commodities like gasoline, oil, coal slurry or water.
  • McGill’s students started building a flow-meter in the basement of Herty Hall. They connected microphones to the outside of a pipe, hooked by cables to an elaborate system of knobs, voltage meters and amplifiers that measure sound waves.
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